Aeronautical Engineering Students Get A Feel of The Largest Aircraft At KQ

   Aeronautical Engineering Students Get A Feel of The Largest Aircraft At KQ Technical University of Kenya (TU-K) Vice-Chancellor Prof Francis Aduol, has emphasized that students pursuing Aerospace and Aviation Engineering program at the university have to attend Industry Based Learning (IBL) outside the university for one solid year. Such a move he noted, will ensure that they are imparted with the right skills and are exposed to the prevailing happenings in the world of work.

“Students must be instilled with discipline and imparted with the right skills. They must be exposed to the hands on skills before graduating. This will enable them become relevant in their field of study,” added VC.

   Aeronautical Engineering Students Get A Feel of The Largest Aircraft At KQ
TU-KVice-Chancellor Prof. Francis Aduol, Executive Dean, Faculty of Engineering Sciences and Technology (FEST) Prof. Alex Muumbo and KQ senior engineer Albert Mwangeka in the cock pit
   Aeronautical Engineering Students Get A Feel of The Largest Aircraft At KQ
Chairman Department of Aerospace and Aviation Engineering Prof. Faustine Ondore (middle) pose for a picture with students.
   Aeronautical Engineering Students Get A Feel of The Largest Aircraft At KQ
Alumni of TU-K now employed by the airline, repairing and maintaining an aircraft.

Prof. Aduol said this when he accompanied Aerospace and Aviation Engineering students to academic trip at the National Carrier Kenya Airways (KQ). He was received by KQ Technical Director Martyn Haines, head of Technical Services Roy Sifuna, head of Base Maintenance Peter Marere among others. Accompanying the VC from the university were; Executive Dean, Faculty of Engineering Sciences and Technology (FEST) Prof. Alex Muumbo and Chairman Department of Aerospace and Aviation Engineering Prof. Faustine Ondore.

The VC who visited KQ hangers and the 787 dream liner , said he was impressed by the training students got as far as technical work is concerned. He appreciated the positive impact the industrial attachment has on engineering students.

He further noted that there will be a framework for formal recognition of qualifications gained from IBL, so that both lecturers and students’ competency and their ability to perform a technical task, are graded for the overall credits for a given academic year.

The Kenya Airways technical managers explained that TU-K was the first Kenyan university to give the airline students in aerospace and aviation engineering discipline. They added that the students are being trained by some of the best in the aviation industry. The VC further reiterated that the University has maintained, its traditional role of training students to handle systems and machinery while still on campus.

TU-K has established partnership with KQ and other stakeholders in the field of Aerospace & Aviation Engineering. Students from the university have been receiving hands-on training at the facilities of KQ and have been allowed academic group visits.